Somaliland247's Blog

July 31, 2011

PRESS RELEASE: Hon. Jim Karygiannis Meets With Somaliland Youth Alliance of North America.


Like This!

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

Add to Google Buzz

PRESS RELEASE: Hon. Jim Karygiannis Meets With Somaliland Youth Alliance of North America.

Robleh Maxamud Aideed (Lafcanbe) and Kulmiye Adam ‘Mardaadi’ of SYANA met with the Honourable Jim Karrygiannis – MP of Scarborough-Agincourt on Friday July 29th, 2011. The aim of the meeting was to introduce SYANA to Rt. Hon. Jim Karygiannias.

Many of the constituents whom Mr. Karygiannias represents in the parliament are of Somali decent, as such we believe it is important that the representatives of those constitutents are familiar with our work. Mr.Karygiannis is particularly a friend of Somaliland, was already familiar of Somaliland and its quest for international recognition. He acknowledged his support for the organization and felt that not only was it the right timing for Somaliland but it was much needed for North America. Mr.Karygiannias also provided advice for SYANA and pledged to keep up with the organization and work with SYANA in the future. He encouraged Robleh and Kulmiye to continue educating people about Somaliland and spread awareness. SYANA will continue to keep in contact with Mr. Karygiannis and will with periodical meetings like this one. Robleh and fellow members of SYANA intend to meet with more politicians and community leaders and organizations in the coming months. You can visit SYANA’s links at www.somalilandyouth.com , www.facebook.com/somalilandyouth and www.twitter.com/somalilandyouth

Jim Karygiannis is the Liberal Member of Parliament for Scarborough-Agincourt. He is currently the Liberal Multiculturalism Critic in the House of Commons. Prior to this, He was appointed Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development in October 2005, Mr.Karygiannis also served as the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport, with special emphasis on Transport and the Environment in 2003.

Advertisements

July 25, 2011

VIDEO:UK Minister for Africa Henry Bellingham Somaliland Visit


Like This!

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

Add to Google Buzz

UK Minister for Africa Henry Bellingham Somaliland Visit

UK Minister for Africa, Henry Bellingham delivering a speech to members of Somaliland parliament during his visit to Republic Of Somaliland

Hargeisa,Somaliland-Britain’s Minister for Africa, Henry Bellingham, on Sunday visited Somaliland, where he held a meeting with the President of Republic of Somaliland Ahmed Silanyo and members of his government. The minister’s visit to Hargeisa, Somaliland is the first to Republic of Somaliland by a British Foreign Office Minister for over three years, and follows the visit of international Development Secretary Andrew Mitchell last February. The  Minister for Africa, Henry Bellingham has delivered a speech to members of  Somaliland parliament during his visit  the elected  House of Representatives.

VIDEO

UK Minister for Africa, Henry Bellingham meeting with Somaliland President Ahmed Mohamed Mohamoud Silanyo during his visit to Hargeisa, Republic Of Somaliland

Somaliland Parliament, the elected House of Representatives

July 21, 2011

Ex-Somali Prime Minister to be deposed in war crimes suit

Filed under: NEWS — somaliland247 @ 2:59 pm
Tags: , ,

Like This!

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

Add to Google Buzz

Ex-Somali Prime Minister to be deposed in war crimes suit

Ex-Somali Prime Minister Ali Samantar (War Criminal)

ALEXANDRIA, Va. (AP) – Aziz Deria has waited seven years to confront the former Somali leader he blames for the deaths of his father, brother and thousands of his countrymen. He could have his chance this week.

Somalia’s former prime minister Mohamed Ali Samantar is scheduled to begin a deposition Thursday in a federal lawsuit accusing him of war crimes. The northern Virginia resident pulled out of previously planned questioning by citing ill health, but a judge has ordered him to cooperate this time unless extraordinary circumstances arise.

Aziz Deria has waited seven years to confront the former Somali leader he blames for the deaths of his father, brother and thousands of his countrymen. He could have his chance this week. Somalia's former prime minister Mohamed Ali Samantar is scheduled to begin a deposition Thursday, July 21, 2011 in a federal lawsuit accusing him of war crimes.

His accuser is skeptical of his efforts to avoid the deposition.

“This man knows what he has done. He will try to do anything to be away from the court system,” said Deria, a 47-year-old businessman in Bellevue, Wash.

In 2004, a human rights group helped Deria and another man sue Samantar under a U.S. law that allows civil action against foreign officials responsible for torture or wrongful killings. They allege Samantar, a one-time top lieutenant to dictator Siad Barre, commited war crimes against northern Somalia’s Isaaq clan in retribution for what he perceived as efforts to split Somalia in two.

Deria’s father is among those who killed in a crackdown on the clan, the lawsuit alleges. The Barre regime collapsed in 1991, and there hasn’t been a strong national government there since.

Samantar was once one of the most important men in Africa, a power broker who used Somalia’s strategic position on the Horn of Africa to gain alternating favor from the United States and the Soviet Union. He served from 1980 to 1986 as defense minister, building one of most formidable armies in sub-Saharan Africa. He served as prime minister from 1986 to 1990.

He now lives in a split-level in the Washington suburb of Fairfax, surrounded not by presidents and potentates but by large extended family. He is still well-known among Somali diaspora.

His illnesses aren’t contrived, says his lawyer Joseph Peter Drennan, explaining that Samantar is on dialysis and has become weaker in recent weeks. He has filed emergency motions with an appeals court seeking to halt the lawsuit. But a judge has ordered that Samantar submit to three days of depositions this month.

For Deria, who is represented by the San Francisco-based Center for Justice and Accountability, the opportunity to question Samantar is the primary reason he has pursued a lawsuit for so many years. The lawsuit was once tossed out by a federal judge who said Samantar had diplomatic immunity, but the U.S. Supreme Court disagreed and reinstated it.

Samantar isn’t wealthy, so Deria does not expect to profit financially. Holding him accountable is the real goal.

Yet many Somalis, even those victimized by the Barre regime, don’t understand why Deria is pursuing Samantar through the U.S. court system.

“They don’t know how to hold people accountable,” Deria said, referring to Somalis and others throughout the developing world, where political leaders are typically above the law. “I want my people to learn about accountability.”

“For him to pretend he is innocent, and that nobody can touch him, it is insulting to our intelligence,” Deria said.

The Somali diaspora has mixed feelings about Samantar and others from the Barre regime, said Ahmed Elmi, chairman of the Somali American Community Association in Silver Spring, Md. Many don’t understand the need to dredge up the past when bad conditions in Somalia still need attention, he said. And while most recognize that atrocities occurred under Barre, others also remember years when schools were built and the country flourished.

Elmi said Somali immigrants generally respect surviving elders from the Barre regime.

For his part, Elmi understands and supports victims’ desire for justice.

“That’s why we have a court,” Elmi said. “If he did these things to my family, I would do the same.”

The lawsuit is deeply personal to Samantar. In 1988, he was a college student in California when Somalia began to deteriorate. His father, Mohamed Deria Ali, operated a large import-export business and planned to move the family from Hargeisa to the capital of Mogadishu. Before he could, though, the military attacked the town the town where many Issaq clan members lived.

Back in the U.S., Aziz Deria lost contact with his family. He eventually learned that his father and younger brother, Mustafa Deria, were taken from the family home and never seen again.

Still, Deria gives Samantar credit for his role in Somalia’s wars against Ethiopia early in his career. He feels sorry for Samantar in some ways and doesn’t consider him evil.

“He became ruthless to survive,” Deria said. “I don’t think he’s a bad person at all. It’s just the nature of dictators.”

Samantar has refused multiple interview requests, but his lawyer said he didn’t persecute the Isaaq clan while in power.

“Samantar, above all, is a fervent nationalist who believes all Somalis should live under one flag,” Drennan said. “He is proud of his service to his country.”

Drennan said the lawsuit is about clan grievances among the Isaaq, many of whom have pursued establishment of an independent state in northern Somalia.

“Certainly, there were human rights abuses under the Barre regime. It was not a democratic regime. But is it worse than al-Shabab?” he asked, referring to the radical Islamic militia that now controls large swaths of the country and is aligned with al-Qaida.

Deria knows that the lawsuit alone won’t provide closure. He’s also been traveling back to the region surrounding his home city to help provide proper burials for remains from hundreds of mass graves dug during the Barre regime. In the rainy seasons, bones sometimes wash up from the river beds.

“It is so disgusting to see the skeletons come out. Those skeletons could be my father, my brother, my cousins” Deria said. “For me to have any closure, those people need to have a proper burial. … It bothers me whenever it rains. It really makes my heart sink.”

July 11, 2011

Somaliland Youth Alliance Of North America Meets with Canadian MPP David Caplan


Like This!

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

Add to Google Buzz

Somaliland Youth Alliance Of North America Meets with Canadian MPP David Caplan

 

It is part of SYANA’s aim to actively promote its goals and create working relationships with the other organizations and elected representatives in the US and Canada. As part of that goal, Robleh Mohamud Aidid (Lafcanbe) of SYANA met with MPP of Don Valley East, David Caplan.

In his Thursday’s meeting, Mr. Aidid explained the vision and goals for SYANA as well as seeing what the local government can do to help the organization. They discussed the aims and goals of the organization and how the representatives assist SYANA to achieve its objectives and help it make a difference in Somaliland Youth. Mr.Caplan was very interested in the organization’s goals and pledged to give guidance, advice and any support SYANA needs. Not only did this meeting benefit the organization with his support, but Mr.Caplan was briefed about the prositive progress Somaliland made.

Mr.Caplan encouraged Mr. Aidid to continue to educating people about Somaliland and spread awareness. SYANA will continue to keep in contact with Mr.Caplan and will with periodical meetings similar to this one. Mr. Aidid and fellow members of SYANA intend to meet with more local politicians and community leaders and organizations in the coming months.

David Caplan was first elected to the provincial legislature in a September 1997 by-election and was re-elected in 1999, 2003 and 2007 to serve the residents of Don-Valley East.

Caplan previously served as Minister of Health and Long-Term Care in June, 2008.

Under his leadership as Minister of Infrastructure Renewal (since 2003), the Government of Ontario won three prestigious urban planning awards recognizing the visionary Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe. Caplan led the introduction of Ontario’s first long-term infrastructure investment plan, ReNew Ontario. In 2005, Caplan assumed oversight of key major public assets, including the Ontario Realty Corporation, the Liquor Control Board of Ontario and the Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corporation, as well as responsibility for Waterfront Toronto. He also served as Deputy Government House Leader.

You can read more information about SYANA by visiting:

www.somalilandyouth.com

www.facebook.com/somalilandyouth

www.twitter.com/somalilandyouth

July 10, 2011

Video: Somaliland President Ahmed Silanyo Speech inside the Plane on his way to South Sudan


Like This!

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

Add to Google Buzz

Video: Somaliland President Ahmed Silanyo Speech inside the Plane on his way to South Sudan

July 8, 2011

Somaliland President Ahmed Silanyo met with British Foreign Secretary William Hague


Like This!

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

Add to Google Buzz

Somaliland President Ahmed Silanyo met with British Foreign Secretary William Hague

Somaliland President Ahmed Mohamed Mohamoud Silanyo and British Foreign Secretary William Hague in Addis ababa, Ethiopia 8th July 2011

Addis Ababa-Somaliland President Ahmed Silanyo met with British Foreign Secretary William Hague in Addis ababa, Ethiopia 8th July 2011 on his way to South Sudan to attend the Declaration of Independence of the Republic of South Sudan on the 9th of July, 2011.

Somaliland President Ahmed Siilaanyo received an official invitation from the president of South Sudan Salva Kiir to attend the Declaration of Independence of the Republic of South Sudan on the 9th of July, 2011. South Sudan is set to become the 54th nation in the African continent after long fought civil against Northern Sudan’s rule that saw thousands of lives lost and millions displaced.

Somaliland President Ahmed Siilaanyo today left for South Sudan to attend the Declaration of Independence of the Republic of South Sudan on the 9th of July, 2011


Like This!

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

Add to Google Buzz

Somaliland President Ahmed Siilaanyo today left for South Sudan to attend the Declaration of Independence of the Republic of South Sudan on the 9th of July, 2011

Somaliland President Ahmed Mohamed Mohamoud Silanyo leaving for South Sudan today at Berbera International Airport 7th July 2011

 

Berbera-Somaliland President Ahmed Siilaanyo received an official invitation from the president of South Sudan Salva Kiir to attend the Declaration of Independence of the Republic of South Sudan on the 9th of July, 2011. South Sudan is set to become the 54th nation in the African continent after long fought civil against Northern Sudan’s rule that saw thousands of lives lost and millions displaced.

The invitation of Somaliland’s president Ahmed Siilanyo to South Sudan’s historic day has been welcomed with delight in Somaliland by both the government of Somaliland and its citizens. Somaliland believes it could use the south’s independence as a precedent as it seeks more support for its case for international recognition and become the 55th nation in the continent after South Sudan. Some foreign observers and politicians believe the Juba government will recognize Somaliland which will pave the way for other regional powers to follow.

Somaliland became a British protectorate in 1888 after the Berlin Conference of 1884-85 during which the European Powers effectively carved up the African continent between themselves. It was in June 26th 1960 upon an agreement signed between Britain and Somaliland that it became an independent country. At that time Somaliland was formerly recognized as the Republic of Somaliland by the UN and 34 countries, including Britain, USA and Egypt. Somaliland willingly decided to unite with South Somalia formerly Italian Somalia on July 1st, 1960 when the South gained their sovereignty from Italia. Somaliland however reclaimed its Sovereignty in 1991 after the overthrow of former dictator Mohamed Siyad Bare and his henchmen after a long brutal civil war.

VIDEO: British Navy Ship dock in Berbera port,Somaliland and invited Somaliland President on board


Like This!

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

Add to Google Buzz

British Navy Ship dock in Berbera port,Somaliland and invited Somaliland President on board

British warship dock in Berbera port, Somaliland and invited Somaliland President Ahmed Silanya on board along with his Delagation which included few Somaliland Government ministers and Military Officers 7th July 2011.

July 7, 2011

Andris Piebalgs European Commissioner for Development Address to House of Representatives of Somaliland


Like This!

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

Add to Google Buzz

Andris Piebalgs European Commissioner for Development Address to House of Representatives of Somaliland

Andris Piebalgs European Commissioner for Development and Somaliland President Ahmed Mohamed Mohamoud Silanyo

Andris Piebalgs European Commissioner for Development Address to House of Representatives of Somaliland Visit of Commissioner in Somaliland House of Representatives of Somaliland

Mr. Speaker,

Honourable Members of the House,

Ladies and Gentlemen,

Introduction

It is both a pleasure and an honour for me to be addressing you today. The fact that I am standing in front of an elected assembly here in Somaliland is in itself testimony to the strides you have made towards stability and democracy.

National and regional issues

For two decades now Somaliland has maintained its stability, despite considerable threats in the form of jihadist terrorism, piracy and the continuing civil war in neighbouring South-Central Somalia. Last June’s presidential elections saw the then opposition leader, President Silanyo – whom I have just had the pleasure of meeting – win by a wide margin. His predecessor, President Rayale, conceded defeat and handed over power in an orderly and peaceful manner. I applaud you for securing such a smooth transition after democratic elections. However, it is something of a first for this troubled region. As such, it must not be taken for granted.

That is why the international community – and in particular the European Union – welcomes the contribution that Somaliland is making to peace and good governance in the IGAD region. And that is why it is so important that Somaliland pursues this course as a standard-bearer for the IGAD region. To that end, we call on you to build on these successes by holding the long overdue elections to local councils and to both Houses of Parliament as soon as possible. You will further enhance Somaliland’s democratic credentials if you manage to make electoral delays and extended mandates a thing of the past. Last not least, also allow me to ask: After all that you have accomplished already, is it not the appropriate time for you to consider how to involve fundamental constituents of society, like women and young people, more closely in politics? Many of you have also advocated for this during the election campaign last year. We sincerely hope that you will pay great attention to this important question when reviewing the electoral laws.

Governance issues

As the largest contributor of development assistance, the European Union has been a steadfast partner in Somaliland’s reconstruction and development process. Since 1995 we have been the only international donor organisation with a permanent presence here. The combined volume of our ongoing assistance to Somaliland currently amounts to approximately 62 million euro.

Up to now our development assistance for Somaliland has centred on support for the public sector, police, courts, democratic institutions, electoral processes and civil society. I was pleased to learn about the recent reform conventions for the civil service, the judiciary and the police force. As the main donor in the major UN programmes assisting you in the area of governance, we strongly appreciate the clear political commitment that Somaliland has displayed here. The government’s efforts to increase domestic revenue collection and initial steps taken by the Civil Service Commission to re-assess government staff have clearly demonstrated that words can be followed by deeds.

We warmly welcome the establishment of the Anti-Corruption and Good Governance Commission and the legislation for the National Human Rights Commission. These are encouraging developments which confirm that our support to Somaliland yields the fruits we had hoped for! The abolition of the “security committees”, a stronger role for the office of the Attorney General and the commitment to increase the number of qualified professionals in the legal sector are further encouraging signs. In particular, I commend your commitment to public finance management reforms. The EU and other international donors stand ready to support you in this difficult and long-term process.

This Parliament has a crucial role to play in good governance, not only by legislating on reforms. As the elected representatives of the people, you are called on to act as pioneers and champions of good governance, integrity and democratic practice, accountable only to your conscience and to your electorate. This is particularly important in a context where under-funded public institutions are struggling to assert their authority vis-à-vis vested business interests and other powerful influences.

The prime importance of governance to any country’s development efforts is clear. For instance, to reduce poverty for good, a country needs robust and honest state institutions that are both able and willing to help poor people improve their standards of living and to provide them with public services, rights and security. Likewise, democratic processes make the state accountable to its people, encourage transparency and guard against corruption. In short, they allow for constructive relations between government and the people.

It is heartening to see that Somaliland is on the right track towards instituting a culture of good governance. However, tough economic and social challenges remain, especially the alarmingly high unemployment rate. We want to see Somaliland’s economic and social development proceed apace. Let me illustrate my point with just a few examples of areas in which the EU is assisting Somaliland on its development path.

Economic and social development examples

EU investment in your education systems forms a second major area of our support. As a result of our combined efforts, school gross enrolment has grown from 38.6 percent in 2006 to an estimated 60 percent in 2010. For girls – to whose education we attach particular importance – enrolment rates have increased from 31 to about 44 percent over the same period. In this context, your government’s decision to introduce free primary education is laudable. Although Somaliland has more than doubled its education budget, we know that free primary education remains a tough challenge from both a financial and an institutional perspective. I am glad to see that your education ministry, also supported by technical experts provided by the EU, is working hard to develop a sustainable solution for this.

Rural development and social services have formed the economic pillar of our assistance in Somaliland for almost five years. At the beginning of last year we promised to return to the infrastructure sector if Somaliland managed to hold peaceful elections. We are living up to this promise. We have recently allocated 19 million euro to rehabilitate and expand urban water infrastructure in several cities across Somaliland. I would simply add here that efficient public-private partnerships will be essential to make these investments sustainable.

While infrastructure support in the water sector is already underway, we plan to do more. The European Union is looking into supporting the feasibility and design study for the rehabilitation of the so-called “Corridor” between the port of Berbera and the Ethiopian border. This study –to be implemented by IGAD and worth 3.8 million euro – should provide us with a final blueprint for strengthening the connection between Ethiopia’s growing markets and Berbera. This important part of the regional infrastructure is further proof that Somaliland has a role to play in facilitating economic integration and development in the Horn of Africa.

And that’s not all: we are about to conclude a review of our five-year cooperation programme for Somalia, including our cooperation with Somaliland. I anticipate that the EU will soon take a decision on a substantial increase of the ongoing support package. This would add 175 million euro to the ongoing programme of 212 million euro. We expect that up to 70 percent of this additional sum will be committed in Somaliland and Puntland, allowing us to continue and step up our efforts here.

With this in mind, I would like to emphasise today that progress towards political stability and security are crucial to obtaining further development assistance from the EU. It follows, then, that these additional development funds will be invested in regions committed to peace, democracy and stability where security and socio-political conditions are favourable.

In this regard, let me say that we were relieved to learn that the acute tensions that existed between Somaliland and Puntland a few months ago have been overcome. We are counting on your commitment to dialogue and the peaceful resolution of differences, with the well-being of your people always foremost in your minds. Cooperative relations between neighbours will benefit all. We therefore appreciate the repeated calls for dialogue and cooperation issued by members of both administrations and reiterate our hope of seeing constructive relations between you flourish.

Conclusion

Mr Speaker, Ladies and Gentlemen,

Despite the problems with which you still have to contend, I believe that the prospects for Somaliland are very good. As the people’s elected representatives, you have a key role to play in securing a bright future for all of your fellow countrymen and women. I believe in your commitment to fulfil that role. So it is pleasing to see that our funding for the recent construction of this beautiful assembly hall – along with training and other capacity-building support – has been money well spent. I trust you will consider our contribution as an encouragement to carry out the duties entrusted to you by the electorate, namely: to represent your constituents; to thoroughly and responsibly debate key issues; to legislate; and to hold the executive accountable.

I thank you for your warm reception and I look forward to pursuing our joint efforts with you to further Somaliland’s economic, social, political and democratic development.

Examples of EU Projects in Somaliland

Filed under: NEWS — somaliland247 @ 3:35 pm
Tags: , , ,

Like This!

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

Add to Google Buzz

Examples of EU Projects in Somaliland

Development aid from the European Commission

On-going, mostly multi-year EU-funded programmes in Somaliland currently amount to approximately €62 million. There are 63 projects ongoing: 27 projects in the governance sector amounting to €21.9 million; 13 projects in the education sector, amounting to €11.2 million; 13 projects in support to economic growth amounting to €15.1 million; and 9 projects worth €8.5 million in other sectors (health, water and sanitation) and EU Flight Operations worth €5.3 million.

EU support to governance and security

The Interpeace-implemented Democratisation programme (different components worth a total a total €3.4 million) supported the delivery of a free and fair presidential election which was held in Somaliland in June 2010. The EU contributed to half of the costs of the elections. Currently, the project enhances and further consolidates the institutional and professional capacities of the National Electoral Commission and provides substantial technical assistance to support parliamentary and local elections to be held in Somaliland.

Support to the legislative Sector in Somaliland: through the Association of European Parliamentarians for Africa (AWEPA) the EU offers training, workshops, seminars and study visits for parliamentarians and parliamentary staff with the objective to create an environment that fosters knowledge sharing of the democratic process. The programme (worth €1.26 million) has been actively supporting legislative institutions since 2004. It has also provided equipment and built a new plenary hall for Somaliland’s parliament in Hargeisa that was inaugurated in 2011.

EU support to education

The EU ‘Education Programme’ aims at contributing to the development of a sustainable, cohesive education system through the provision of relevant services to the entire population. The Somaliland Ministry of Education is supported with training and technical assistance. Access to primary and secondary education is improved through the construction and rehabilitation of schools and the training of new teachers; and Somaliland youth have a better chance of finding jobs through vocational education and training.

More than an estimated 80 percent of Somalilanders are currently illiterate. With EU support, around 180,000 adults and children in Somaliland have been trained since 2008 and have been given the opportunity of an education. EU support to this sector amounts to €36 million (Somaliland component) over a 6-year period.

The Accelerated Primary Education Support Programme: implemented by a consortium of NGOs, the programme (worth €2.1 million) increases access to quality primary education for school age children (including girls) from poor and marginalised communities. Key results of this programme so far include the construction and refurbishment of 90 new permanent classrooms in formal schools and training centres, the renovation of 40 classrooms already existing and the review and update of text books and curricula in close collaboration with the Ministry of Education and training for 70 head teachers on inclusive and gender sensitive planning and management of schools.

EU support to health

Safe Motherhood in Hargeisa: 972 mothers delivered their babies safely in health facilities supported through the EU-funded Health Poverty Action (HPA) project. This is an extraordinary accomplishment in a context where more than half of pregnant women deliver without the presence of a trained health worker and face the risk of death or disability due to pregnancy-related complications. Up until 2009, there was no functional hospital referral system for obstetric emergencies in Somaliland. With EU funding (€2,1 million) HPA successfully established a maternity referral system including free transportation and free obstetric health services for indigent mothers in Hargeisa and has helped more than 2,800 mothers since its inception. In 2010, HPA developed and aired 13 radio programmes on positive health seeking behaviour. The uptake of modern family planning devices is also on the increase. This is a result of sustained efforts to promote health education through radio programmes, outreach theatre as well as counselling by trained nursing staff.

Training Human Resources for Health: implemented by the Tropical Health and Education Trust in partnership with Kings College Hospital in London, this project (worth €585,000) provides training to health professionals addressing the human resource development needs of the health sector and effectively contributing to saving lives. 31 medical students have been assisted with skills-based, interactive and participative teaching tools. It is also expected that almost 500 students enrolled in the academic year 2010-11 will benefit from effective training methodologies and clinical development in areas of need.

The EU and the Millennium Development Goals

Adopted by world leaders in the year 2000 and set to be achieved by 2015, the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) provide a framework, both global and local, for the entire international community to work together towards a common end: making sure that human development reaches everyone, everywhere. Despite the inherent difficulties, Somaliland can already report considerable achievements which are the result of EU-funded initiatives in the period 2004-2010:

MDG 1 Eradicate Extreme Poverty and Hunger

almost 10,000 Somalilanders benefitted from technical and vocational education and training

35,580 Somalilanders targeted with unconditional cash transfers

MDG 2: Achieve Universal Primary Education

13,000 primary school teachers were trained and of these 4,000 were fully certified

100 schools were built or rehabilitated

75,000 pupils were enrolled in primary education (with a ratio of 6:4 of boys and girls)

MDG 3: Promote Gender Equality & Empower Women

7,800 new female students were enrolled in secondary education

60 scholarships were awarded in Somaliland for female trainees

MDG 4: Reduce Child Mortality & MDG 5: Improve Maternal Health

3,700 births were attended by skilled health personnel

101,000 consultations took place on reproductive health

MDG 7: Ensure Environmental Sustainability

600,000 Somalilanders benefited from improved drinking water

300,000 Somalilanders benefited from training and various activities of awareness raising for improved hygiene and sanitation

EU support to economic development

The EU supports agriculture and livestock production and marketing. It also promotes initiatives aimed at reducing unemployment and underemployment in urban areas through labour-intensive infrastructure projects and job creation. Interventions mobilize local expertise and labour potential by contracting small and medium-sized enterprises and, with that, promote private sector development in various fields including energy, electricity and water services. EU-funded projects also support Public Private Partnerships (PPPs) as supplementary and innovative means in the provision of public services.

An Irrigation project (worth €2.5 million) in the Awdal Region (Somaliland) will start in July 2011, implemented by the Food and Agriculture Organisation. The project aims to raise agricultural productivity and net incomes of poor rural households in Somaliland by providing an integrated package of support covering irrigation, agricultural advisory services, marketing and post-harvest support and technical assistance in the framework of private-led economic development.

The Somali Animal Health Services project (worth €1.5 million) provides training and technical assistance to various institutions in Somaliland which provide animal disease surveillance. The project helped developing the Somaliland Veterinary Code and trained staff in the use of commercially produced rapid diagnostic test kits for key trade limiting animal diseases.

Next Page »

%d bloggers like this: