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October 31, 2010

Madaxweynaha JSL Mudane: AXMED MAXAMED MAXAMUUD (SIILAANYO) ayaa Maanta Guddi heer qaran ah u magacaabay Tayeynta Billicda Caasimada Dalka ee Hargeisa oo ah Muraayadi Dalka.


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Madaxweynaha JSL Mudane: AXMED MAXAMED MAXAMUUD (SIILAANYO) ayaa Maanta Guddi heer qaran ah u magacaabay Tayeynta Billicda Caasimada Dalka ee Hargeisa oo ah Muraayadi Dalka.

 War-Saxaafadeed 

Madaxweynaha JSL Mudane: AXMED MAXAMED MAXAMUUD (SIILAANYO) ayaa Maanta  Guddi heer qaran ah u magacaabay Tayeynta Billicda Caasimada Dalka ee Hargeisa oo ah Muraayadi Dalka.

Guddidan uu madaxweynuhu magacaabay oo ka kooban Lix (6) Xubnood oo ka kooban  Wasiiro iyo Maayerka Caasimada.

Madaxwynuhu waxa uu Magacaabista Gudida ku  yidhi sidan:

Mudanayaal, Sida aad ka war qabtaan, bilicda iyo muuqaalka caasimaddu wuxuu qayb muhiim ah ka qaadanaya milgaha dawladnimo.  

Haddaba Mudanayaal, laga bilaabo taariikhda warqadan waxaan idiin magacaabay Guddida Bilicda Caasimadda Hargeysa, waxana gudoomiye idiin noqon doona Wasiirka Wasaaradda Arrimaha Gudaha, Dr. Maxamed Cabdi Gaboose.

 Magacyada Gudida

1.      Dr. Maxamed Cabdi Gaboose,    Wasiirka Wasaaradda Arrimaha Gudaha 

2.      Eng. Maxamed Xaashi Cilmi,  Wasiirka Wasaaradda Maaliyadda 

3.      Mudane, Xuseen Axmed Caydiid, Wasiirka Wasaaradda Hawlaha Guud iyo Gaadiidka  

4.      Dr. Xuseen Axmed Maxamed (Xoog),Wasiirka Wasaaradda Caafimaadka 

5.      Mudane, Cabdilaahi Jaamac Cismaan (Geel-jire), Wasiirka Wasaaradda Warfaafinta  

6.      Mudane, Xuseen Maxamuud Jiciir,  Maayarka Magaaladda Hargeysa, Ahna Gudoomiyaha Golaha Deegaanka                       

Ugu danbayn waxa uu Madaxweynuhu Gudidan kula Dardaarmay in ay Sida ugu Dhakhsaha Badan hawshan u Gutaan oo ay Xil wayn iska Saaran Waxaanu yidhi madaxweynuhu Illaahay Haydin Fudaydiyo hawshaa

 ALLAA                         MAHAD                             LEH

Cabdillaahi Maxamed Daahir  ( Cukuse )

Af-hayeenka Madaxtooyada JSL

 

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October 27, 2010

Mr. Soren Pind, Minister for Development Cooperation of Denmark Somaliland Visit


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Mr. Soren Pind, Minister for Development Cooperation of Denmark Somaliland Visit

 

HARGEISA,  — Mr. Soren Pind, Minister for Development Cooperation of Denmark today arrived the capital of Somaliland, Hargeisa. Minister Pind who was leading a Danish delegate met with Somaliland President Ahmed Mohamed Mohamud at Mansoor hotel where they had a closed door meeting. This was the first time that Somaliland and the government of Denmark has had a such a high level direct talk and this is seen as a positive step in Somaliland.

After their meeting concluded the president’s office released a press statement acknowledging that President Ahmed Mohamud and Minister Pind had a meeting in Mansoor hotel. In their meeting President Mohamud spoke about Somaliland’s self sufficient, security, economic development and how it is able to do so much with the little resource that it has. President Mohamud also spoke about how Somaliland has satisfied all the requirements to become an independent state. Before their meeting ended President Mohamud informed minister Pind that Somaliland people thanked the Danish government for their support with the recent election that the country had.

Before Minister Pind departed back he was able to tour State House district where currently Southern Somali’s displaced refugees are settled. After touring State House district Minister Pind toured two Danish NGOs currently based in Somaliland DDG and DRC where he was presented with local folk dance and arts. After a successful visit to Somaliland Minister Sorin Pind departed from Egal International Airport.

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(SomalilandPress)

October 22, 2010

IRIN: Stability in Somaliland boosts education prospects

Filed under: NEWS — somaliland247 @ 7:16 pm
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IRIN: Stability in Somaliland boosts education prospects

 

HARGEISA, 22 October 2010 (IRIN) – Somalis from south-central Somalia and those in the diaspora have taken advantage of the stable environment in the Republic of Somaliland to put their children through school there, boosting enrolment in private and public education institutions in the region, officials said.

Ali Mohamed Ali, the director-general of Somaliland's Education Ministry: Somaliland allow Somalis from south-central Somalia access to public services, despite considering them as refugees

“About 10 percent of 200,000 primary-school children are from south-central Somalia,” Ali Mohamed Ali, the director-general of Somaliland’s Education Ministry, told IRIN.

Authorities in Somaliland allow Somalis from south-central Somalia access to public services such as healthcare and education, despite considering them as refugees.

Ali said: “The late president of Somaliland [Mohamed Ibrahim Egal] said all Somalis, wherever they are from, have similar rights as Somalilanders, except political rights. It is not only the Somalis who are in our public schools; we have students even from the Oromo community of Ethiopia.”

Abdi-Rahman Mohamed Mal, the former education director-general, said Somaliland’s 392 public primary schools had only 2,367 teachers, with 40 percent of Somaliland children having access to education.

Mohamed Ali Warsame, 14, originally from south-central Somalia, is a beneficiary of Somaliland’s generosity. He is a student at a boarding school, Abaarso-Tech, 23km northwest of Hargeisa, the Somaliland capital.

Warsame’s school is one of two high schools in the region approved by the Somaliland National Examinations Board to admit intermediate school leavers. The two schools admit only students who attained the highest marks in their intermediate examinations. Each admits at least 50 students per year.

Taking refuge

Civil society organizations estimate that half a million Somalis have sought refuge in Somaliland in the past 19 years.

“At least 300,000 Somalis from south-central Somalia live in centres for the internally displaced in Somaliland while about 200,000 others live in Somaliland’s main urban centres,” Saleban Ismail Bulale, chairman of the Horn of Africa Human Rights Watch, said.

In addition to south-central Somalis, hundreds of those in the diaspora have also taken their children to Somaliland in search of education and cultural experiences.

Abaarso-Tech s one of two high schools in Somaliland approved by the National Examinations Board to admit intermediate school leavers

Khalif Abdi, an American Somali studying at Abaarso-Tech, said: “One of the interesting things I am learning about here is ‘Laxoox’ [Somali pancakes]. I am also learning the Somali language because I have to converse with fellow students in Somali.”

Abdi said his parents sent him to Abaarso-Tech not only for the education but also to learn about Somali culture.

Jonathan Starr, managing director of Abaarso Tech, told IRIN: “We have students here from Europe, Ethiopia and from [the rest of] Somalia; once they pass the entry examination, we admit them to the school.”

Limited resources

With the high number of diaspora returnees and those from south-central Somalia, however, Somaliland authorities have expressed concern over stretching public service resources.

Ali, the education director-general, said: “International donors support Kenya, Ethiopia and Djibouti for hosting Somali refugees but the problem in Somaliland is that the international community does not consider the problems caused by the high number of diaspora returnees and refugees from Somalia… this has limited the provision of education, health and public service as a whole; already Somalilanders themselves do not have adequate public services.”

He urged the international community to support Somaliland to improve its public services, including the provision of teacher training and improving schools of technology.

Source: IRIN

October 15, 2010

US eyes Somaliland as answer to Mogadishu’s woes


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US eyes Somaliland as answer to Mogadishu’s woes

In this photo taken Wednesday Oct. 13. 2010 Somaliland President Ahmed Mohamud Silanyo, seated, meets with officials from the U.N., European Union and the World Bank in Hargeisa, Somaliland. Somaliland officials say the U.S. and the the international community have wasted too much time and money on Mogadishu instead of supporting a struggling but democratically elected government in Somaliland.(AP Photo/Jason Straziuso)

By JASON STRAZIUSO, Associated Press Writer,
Friday, October 15, 2010

HARGEISA, Somalia — A new six-story office building will soon house a $1 billion-a-year business. The recently elected president has appointed smart people and won the admiration of the international community. Gunfire is nowhere to be heard.All this seems too good to be true for the war-ravaged nation of Somalia. Yet Somalia this is, or more precisely Somaliland, a slice of the northern part of the country.This former British colony joined Somalia a half-century ago but changed its mind in 1991 when the central government in Mogadishu collapsed and most of the rest of the country became mired in war. The United States, the United Nations and other international players don’t recognize Somaliland as a separate country, but they are now lavishing new money and attention on the region.Somaliland officials say the international community has wasted too much time and money on Mogadishu and its string of failed governments. They say the struggling but democratically elected government in the north deserves support and can serve as a bulwark against spreading terrorism.

In bullet-riddled Mogadishu and in much of the rest of Somalia to the south, a hardline Islamist insurgency is in control and is threatening the central government’s tiny hold on the country. To the north, across the narrow Gulf of Aden, lies Yemen, a hotspot for Islamist militancy.

“This is a country called Somaliland that is peaceful and democratic … where the streets are full of uniformed children with book in hand going to school, not hooded, with guns, going to war,” President Ahmed Mohamud Silanyo told a visiting delegation from the U.N., EU, World Bank and African Development Bank earlier this week.

A six-story cement building dominates this city’s skyline. Once completed, it will house the headquarters of a money transfer company that operates in 144 countries.

Yet Somaliland is bathed in poverty. Huts fashioned from scrap metal and wrapped in plastic sheeting dot the capital, crammed full of the internally displaced. Rusted cars are heaped in a jumble. Discarded plastic bags snag on cacti growing in the sandy ground. Goats and sheep wander the streets, seeking shade from the afternoon sun.

Since his June election, Silanyo has tapped Somaliland’s diaspora to recruit U.S.- and British-educated technocrats to run the country. He slashed the size of his Cabinet, instilling confidence in the international community about the way he will run Somaliland, an area the size of North Carolina with 3.5 million people.The successful election and the new government’s serious approach merit increased attention, said Mark Bowden, the top U.N. humanitarian representative for Somalia.Somaliland became independent in 1960 before joining Somalia only days later. Because no country has yet recognized its 1991 declaration of re-independence, the world community sees it as part of Somalia. Business leaders at a trade fair in Hargeisa this week said the lack of recognition creates impediments to economic growth: No access to credit, high insurance rates on imported shipping, severely restricted ability to travel.

Despite the poverty and restrictions, the government has capable, educated leaders who are infusing the town with a can-do spirit. Dahabshiil, the money transfer company building the six-story headquarters, facilitates the transfer of $1 billion from Somaliland’s overseas diaspora. And many of those diaspora’s leaders are returning here.

Hussein Bulhan, a Harvard-educated former professor at Boston University, is the president of Hargeisa University. He believes the U.S. should take notice and invest more.

“Following Sept. 11, the focus has become fighting terrorism,” said Bulhan. “Too much focus has been put into putting out fires instead of building the peace.”

Johnnie Carson, the top U.S. diplomat for Africa, announced last month that the U.S. is trying a new, two-track approach to Somalia that will see continued support of the Mogadishu government but also direct engagement with Somaliland and neighboring Puntland, another autonomous region.

More American diplomats and aid workers will travel to Somaliland, Carson said. USAID, the U.S. government aid arm, dedicated $7 million to Somaliland in fiscal year 2009. In 2010 that number is rising to $26 million.

“Where you have pockets of stability and pockets of people willing to actively contribute to develop the country as a whole, it just makes sense to develop their capacity,” said a U.S. Embassy spokesman in Kenya who was not allowed to be identified because of State Department rules.Bowden, the U.N. official, said Somaliland gets about $80 million to $100 million a year in aid money, but that the number could double.Somaliland’s trade fair highlighted the region’s soap makers, tile makers and university offerings. Saeed Odugheal, 40, grew up in Britain but now owns a water bottling company here.

“Somaliland is Africa’s best kept secret,” he said. “What I want to see is a hell of a lot more development money. People talk about creating a democracy. This is a democracy. It’s only right to support a country like that.”

Carson said the U.S. will not recognize Somaliland as independent because the African Union will not do so. Somaliland Foreign Minister Mohamed A. Omar acknowledged that the AU is afraid that if Somaliland is recognized, other regions might clamor for the same. But he said Somaliland’s situation is unique.

“We are not starting a new nation. We have been a nation before,” said Omar, who holds a doctorate in political science from Britain’s University of Birmingham. “We voluntarily joined with Somalia in 1960. We are withdrawing from that union.”

Omar said the region would like to share intelligence with the West and receive more direct security aid, adding that the region has a strong record of fighting piracy and terrorism. Hargeisa was hit by a suicide bomb attack in 2008.

“Somaliland has been attacked by terrorists not only because they hate us, what I think what they are attacking is the principles and values we stand for, which is democracy,” Omar said. “These are universal values that have been attacked. We need universal support and universal defense in order to defend those values.”Somaliland’s minister of mining, energy and water resources traded a six-figure job in Los Angeles for his new role. He said without $40 million in repairs, Hergeisa’s water system could collapse. The minister, Hussein Abdi Dualeh, urged the international community to switch its focus from Mogadishu to Somaliland.

“The aid we get here won’t be torn up by shrapnel,” he said.

 

 

 

 

 

Source: AP

In this photo taken Wednesday, Oct ,13. 2010, gymnasts perform at a trade fair in Hargeisa, Somaliland. Somaliland officials say the U.S. and the international community have wasted too much time and money on Mogadishu instead of supporting a struggling but democratically elected government in Somaliland in northern Somalia.(AP Photo/Jason Straziuso) (Jason Straziuso - AP)

In this photo taken Tuesday Oct, 12 2010 a vendor at a trade fair in Hargeisa, Somaliland shows off video conferencing technology. Somaliland officials say the U.S. and the rest of the international community have wasted too much time and money on Mogadishu instead of supporting a struggling but democratically elected government in Somaliland.(AP Photo/Jason Straziuso)

In this photo taken Tuesday, Oct. 12, 2010 Somaliland's Speaker of Parliament Abdirahman M. Abdillahi shows off a new parliament building under construction in Hargeisa, Somaliland. Somaliland officials say the U.S. and the rest of the international community have wasted too much time and money on Mogadishu instead of supporting a struggling but democratically elected government in Somaliland. (AP Photo/Jason Straziuso)

October 6, 2010

NGOs are out of control: Somaliland Minister of Planning and Development


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NGOs are out of control: Somaliland Minister of Planning and Development

 
 

Dr. Sa’ad Ali Shire Somaliland’s Minister of Planning and Development

 

HARGEISA -Dr. Sa’ad Ali Shire Somaliland’s Minister of Planning and Development today addressed Somaliland parliament for the first time since taking office. Dr. Shire told members of parliament that since he took office he has been working on a report to see where the country stood with regards to development. Dr. Shire spoke about his findings and one of the issues that caught his attention was the number of NGOs and the lack of development that they have done.

Dr. Shire went on to say currently there are 300 International Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) registered in Somaliland and these NGOs are not being held accountable for all their financial funding. These 300 International Non-Governmental Organizations in the country are said to be working in the fields of education, social service and community development. However there is no single tangible thing that shows what these NGOs have done for the people of Somaliland and that to me is unacceptable.

Dr. Shire blamed the government for failing to account the donor funds that these NGOs are getting on behalf of Somaliland citizens. Another factor that allowed for these NGOs to go out of control is the lack of auditing system that would requires these NGOs to maintain transparent accounting. Dr. Shire went farther to say that he is very disappointed with his findings regarding these NGOs and therefore something must be done about them.

Minister Dr. Sa’ad Ali Shire concluded his briefing by telling members of the parliament that his office is presently working on a strategy that will begin registering these NGOS and audit them at the end of each fiscal year to verify where donor funding was spend. Dr. Shire also suggested that a committee be formed that will work with NGOs and donor countries.

Source: SomalilandPress| Oct 6,2010

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