Somaliland247's Blog

June 21, 2011

Somaliland Youth Alliance Of North America (SYANA) launch


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Somaliland Youth Alliance Of North America (SYANA) launch

I’d would like to announce the great news of the launch of the Somaliland Youth Alliance Of North America, (SYANA). We are an alliance of young adults spread around North America (USA and Canada) who hail from Somaliland. Some of us haven’t had the opportunity to see Somaliland, some don’t speak the language, but since our parents came to North America within the last 20 to 25 years, we have strong connections there. Among the reasons for setting up this organization is to one day go there and take part in the development of the country and the people. Why development? Because Somaliland is still recovering from the brutal war imposed on its people by the former dictator of Somalia which left the country in ruins and its citizens fleeing to all over the world. The dictator and his soldiers may have gone over 20 years ago,but the effects of the war still linger and are visible among the people and the country. Somaliland, now a democracy, isn’t a recognized by any nation which makes its recovery from the war slow. However, the people have shown amazing resilience and willingness to rebuild their country. The spirit of the people, including its youth, wherever they may be, is all time high as evidenced by the recent May 18th celebrations held by Somalilanders around the world.

How can we help Somaliland?

Most families here in North America regularly send money to relatives back home. Many also travel home in the Summer and they help the local economy by spending their money. That in itself keeps the economy going and contributes to the development. However, among the Somaliland expatriate, there are those who take their knowledge and help the less fortunate ones including the sick and the poor. This is what inspires us to follow their footsteps and one day travel over there as teachers and doctors, and do our part in helping reconstruct not only the country but also the society’s recovery from the lingering devastation of the war.

Our objectives are not limited to just helping the country, but include the desire to establish links with the youth over there and learn more of the culture that we have not had the opportunity to learn first hand.

Who can join this group?

Literally any one who shares our objectives. You don’t have to be a Somalilander, and you don’t have to have any links to the country. Our organization is open to all people.

Please Visit our links at

www.somalilandyouth.com

www.facebook.com/somalilandyouth

www.twitter.com/somalilandyouth

Robleh Maxamud Lafcanbe

Founder/Chairman

lafcanbe@somalilandyouth.com

Toronto, Canada

June 16, 2011

Recognising Somaliland would boost the fight against piracy


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Recognising Somaliland would boost the fight against piracy

Godfrey Bloom is a Member of the European Parliament (MEP) for Yorkshire and the Humber,England for the United Kingdom Independence Party (UKIP)

16.06.2011
Attempts to tackle the scourge of piracy and keep the Red Sea open for merchant shipping.

On 6 June, Catherine Ashton, the EU‘s foreign policy chief, spoke to the Asia-Europe Meeting in Budapest and, among other things, she touched on the situation off the coast of Somalia, pointing out that 500 people have been imprisoned for piracy off the coast of Somalia and saying that the solution to piracy “lies on land”. It does, of course.

With the decent of Yemen and the port of Aden into chaos and with a very real risk that it will become the preserve of fundamentalists, one of the world’s most vital arteries has a distinct possibility of being cut.

So what to do? How can we help tackle the scourge of piracy and keep the Red Sea open for merchant shipping. Well, one simple way would be to recognise the country of Somaliland. A couple of weeks ago the peaceful democratic Islamic nation of Somaliland celebrated 20 years of independence. On the same day that Ashton was vapouring about things needing to be done, a Somaliland court put six pirates in prison for a total of 45 years.

Is it not time that this peaceful land was granted recognition by the international community? Not just because we morally should, but because it is in our interests to support the only part of that unhappy corner of the world that is looking forward to peace and prosperity?

Godfrey Bloom MEP

Brussels

Source: http://www.europeanvoice.com

June 14, 2011

Why the international community does not recognise Somaliland?

Filed under: NEWS — somaliland247 @ 11:41 am
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Why the international community does not recognise Somaliland?

 

 

On May 18, the self-declared Republic of Somaliland marked its 20th anniversary of independence from the rest of Somalia. The occasion must have passed almost unnoticed by many around the world since this breakaway nation is not recognised internationally and hardly catches the attention of the world media.

Somaliland, with a population of about 4 million, is an ex-British colony that willingly merged with the former Italian Somalia at independence in 1960 to form the republic of Somalia. But under the military dictatorship of Mohamed Siad Barre, Somaliland was neglected, although it remained an integral part of the Somali state.

Following the overthrow of the Barre regime in May 1991, which left behind a country engulfed by anarchy and bloody inter-clan fighting, Somaliland seceded from the rest of Somalia and declared independence on the same day. Since then, efforts at reconciliation between the different Somali clans, drafting a new Constitution and democratisation have helped Somaliland metamorphose into one of a few peaceful, stable and progressive states on our continent.

In the last two decades the country has made gigantic strides on the socio-economic and political front, though it does not get any assistance from Western creditors to build its economy due to lack of international recognition. It relies for its development, on livestock exports, tourism and remittances from Somalis in the Diaspora, which are estimated at $ 650 million a year.

Even with its sparse resources, Somaliland has registered striking accomplishments, especially in the health and education sectors. For example, it has registered considerable reduction in maternal and child mortality.

According to the deputy minister of Health, Nimo Hussein Qawthan, maternal mortality rate has declined from 1,600 deaths per 100,000 women in 1991 to 1,044 per 100,000 in 2006; child mortality rate which was 275 in 1990, has dropped to 166 in 2006. And because of the vigorous fight against malaria, the country is almost malaria-free!

With regard to education, Somaliland has three world-class universities and several colleges as well as polytechnic schools – all built without foreign assistance. In 1991, according to Prof Ahmed Hussein Essa of the University of Hargeisa, there were a total of 219 primary, intermediate and secondary schools. Today the number of primary schools alone has increased to 506. Literacy rates have gone up from 20 per cent in 1991 to 45 per cent in 2010.

And, politically, the country’s multi-party democracy experimentation has been impressive; respect for human rights and the exercise of the freedom of expression and assembly are some of the salient features of the democratisation process. The country has successfully held three parliamentary and municipal elections, two presidential elections as well as smooth transfer of power since the death of President Mohamed Ibrahim Egal in May 2002.

But despite all these successes, Somaliland is still not recognised internationally as an independent and sovereign state. This surprises many an analyst (and infuriates the Somalilanders) because the country, which will never rejoin stateless Somalia, meets all the standard criteria of an independent state.

Interestingly, Somaliland is remarkably different from Croatia and Kosovo – nations that never had a separate history from Serbia. Yet, the two break-away nations became independent with the support of the Western powers, followed by the rest of the world.

On the other hand, the republic of Somaliland is not different from Eritrea which had a separate history from Ethiopia, but was allowed its independence. And Southern Sudan, which is historically part of the Sudan, recently decided to secede through a referendum and got international support. Now, why, one might ask, should Somaliland be treated differently? Is it because it has no oil?

Soon, the Western countries will be falling over each other to open embassies in Juba, as they scramble for Southern Sudan’s oil, while Somaliland, which is well managed compared to most African countries that are endowed with natural resources, remains totally ignored; but for how long? This unique country needs to be recognised so that it can become a member of the international community, do business with the rest of the world and be able to sign international treaties.

By Mr Kagaruki: is a political analyst based in Dar es Salaam

Source: TheCitizen.co.tz

June 12, 2011

VIDEO: Madaxweyne Somaliland Siilaanyo oo Kormeer aan Noociisa Hore loo Arag ku Maray Xalay Hargeysa


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Madaxweyne Somaliland Siilaanyo oo Kormeer aan Noociisa Hore loo Arag ku Maray Xalay Hargeysa

June 8, 2011

Gudoomiyaha Degmada Xagal Siciid Jaamac Ayax oo si Ba’an u Dhaliilay Maamulka Gobolka Saaxil


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Gudoomiyaha Degmada Xagal Siciid Jaamac Ayax oo si Ba’an u Dhaliilay Maamulka Gobolka Saaxil

Somaliland| Dawlada hoose ee Berbera ayaa keentay booyad cusub nooca daamurka

Filed under: NEWS — somaliland247 @ 2:50 pm
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Dawlada hoose ee Berbera ayaa keentay booyad cusub nooca daamurka

Somaliland: Committee on the formation of more political parties returns with YES verdict

Filed under: NEWS — somaliland247 @ 2:42 pm
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Somaliland: Committee on the formation of more political parties returns with YES verdict

HARGEISA—After three months of research and interviews with Somaliland citizens in all parts of the country, the committee that President Ahmed Mohamud Silanyo appointed for the task of formation of more political parties has handed in their result back to the president with a YES verdict.

The statement from the Committee to study the formation of more political parties in the country said” after conducting 1769 surveys from all the regions of the country, the committee found that the majority of Somaliland citizens are in favorite of opening the political parties”. Committee goes on to add that from understanding the surveys, debates and group discussion that they had with the civil society it showed that there is a vast need for more political parties and therefore the will of the people should be followed by allowing the more political parties to join the political arena.

It was in 2002 when Somaliland’s current three political parties system was formed after more than a dozen parties registered and took place. The legislation stated that in order for a party to advance to the next stage it must receive minimum 20 percent of the popular vote from four of Somaliland’s six regions. Six parties met that criteria and went into a battle to further minimize the number of parties. Constitution was agreed on that only the three parties with the most votes will be approved and the electoral commission announced the current three parties UDUB, UCID and Kulmiye.

Even though Somaliland has three political parties and viable democratic institutions, many groups from current cabinet minister of the incumbent government and ordinary citizens have called for more political parties. During the well contested election campaigned, President Silanyo promised if he gets elected that his government will offer state support for those wishing to form new political parties while inviting blacklisted parties to join his Kulmiye party in the mean time. Current Finance Minister Eng. Mohamed Hashi Elmi and current Interior Minister Dr. Mohamed Abdi Gabose and their Qaran party were one such party that took the invitation from Kulmiye.

Somaliland combines traditional and western institutions to form its own distinctive system that has worked for the country in the last twenty years. Many have recognized this unique system which is the backbone of its stability and its abilities to resolve internal disputes thus allowing it to named Africa’s best kept secret.

(SomalilandPress)

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