Somaliland247's Blog

January 16, 2013

Some work of the Greatest Somali poet, Mahamed Ibrahim Warsame ‘Hadraawi’ translated into English

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Some work of the Greatest Somali poet, Mahamed Ibrahim Warsame ‘Hadraawi’ translated into English

Poet Hadraawi

Greatest Somali poet Mahamed Ibrahim Warsame ‘Hadraawi’

kayd.org – We, in Kayd Somali Art and Culture, Redsea –online Culture Foundation and the Poetry Translation Centre take pride and pleasure to announce the publication for the first time of selected poems of the Somali master of wordsmith, Maxamed Ibraahim Warsame HADRAAWI along with their English translations.

Hadraawi has been recently awarded the prestigious Prince Claus Award for his immense contribution in creating brilliant meaningful poetry over the past 40 years. The presentation ceremony of the award by His Excellency Joost Reintjes, Ambassador of the Kingdom of the Netherlands will be towards the end of February 2013. Our publication of Hadraawi’s work is primarily meant to register our acknowledgement and appreciation of his magnificent role in the promotion of Somali arts and culture. We nonetheless wish to highlight this felicitous occasion.

In this modest publication we have selected only eight of his huge literary treasure trove:

Hal La Qalay .. (The Killing of the She-camel)
Hooyooy La’aantaa.. (Mother’s Love)
Dhigaalka FarSoomaalida.. ( adoption of written script for my language)
Cajabey, Cajabey..( A love beyond compare)
Sirta Nolosha..(Life’s Essence)
Daalacan..(Clarity)
Bulsho.. (My people)
Jacayl Dhiig Ma Lagu Qoray.. (Has Love Been Ever Written inBlood !

In honouring Hadraawi this is what the august Prince Claus Award Committee has said: He is honoured for “creating proud and beautiful poems that enrich and expand the centuries-old oral poetry tradition that is central to contemporary Somali culture and identity, for sustaining shared historical awareness and include discourse in divisive times, for his lifelong commitment to community development and social justice, and for building bridges, providing inspiration and promoting peace.”

Introduction to the book is by Rashid Sheikh Abdillahi (Gadhweyne), the English literal translations are by Mohamed Hassan ‘Alto’, and Said Jama Hussein. The English translations are by Dr. Martin Orwin, and the eminent poet W.N Herbert.

We finally wish to express our heartfelt congratulations to our great poet Hadraawi and our sincere gratitude to the Prince Claus Committee for its laudable service to our culture. For the fans and lovers of Hadraawi’s art, we conclude ‘ENJOY THE DAY’.

About the poet: Mahamed Ibrahim Warsame ‘Hadraawi’

Hadraawi is one of the most valued Somali poets and philosophers; he is often hailed as the most influential Somali artist of his time. His early work concerned love, and his songs were sung by some of the greatest Somali singers. As the political climate changed, so did his focus; his work began to address more social and political issues. He campaigned for the alleviation of social ills through his work under great pressure. To this day, Hadraawi continues to challenge social injustices.

Hadraawi was born into a nomadic family in Togdheer region of Somaliland and he was sent to Aden, Yemen, to live with his uncle at an early age. Hadraawi moved to Mogadishu in the late 1960s. During this time, most of his work focused, like most other poets at the time, on the theme of love. In these high days of romance, Hadrawi produced poems like‘Todobaadan Midhabley’ and songs such as, ‘Baladweyn’, ‘Jacayl Dhiig Malagu Qoray?’, ‘Hooyooy’, ‘Cajabey, Cajiibey’. One could write a whole book about each song and poem as they all have their own story. The songs of this era written by Hadraawi, have been sung by the greatest Somali singers like Hassan Adan Samater, Mahamed Mooge, Haliima Khaliif Magool, Mohamed Saleban and many others.

In the 1970s, Hadraawi’s artistic productions evolved to address more social and political themes. During this time Hadraawi co-wrote the landmark political play ‘Aqoon iyo Afgarad’ with the late Mahamed Hashi Dhama ‘Gaarriye’, Siciid Saalax and late Musse Abdi Elmi.

In 1973, Hadraawi was jailed for five years. Two years after his release, Hadraawi and his friend, late Mahamed Hashi Dhama ‘Gaarriye’ started the Deeley, one of the most significant political chain poems in Somali History, which divided over 50 artists, poets and thinkers in pro and against government camps.

In 1982, Hadraawi left Mogadishu to join the SNM opposition group which was based in Ethiopia. It was there that he wrote or popularized his main political poems such as ‘Dalaley’, ‘Hanbaber’, ‘Hargeysi ma Toostay’, ‘Bulsho’, ‘Sirta Nolosha’ and many others.
1992, Hadraawi produced ‘Gudgude’, which is regarded as a masterpiece by many of his follower. In this hundred lines long poem, he explains his motivations and aspirations.

That year is also the year he moved to London where he lived for five years. In these five years, most of his friends have asked Hadraawi to seek asylum and settle in the UK but Hadraawi declined. While in London, Hadraawi produced ‘Dabo Huwan’ which is based around an ancient word to describe ‘life’. The work he has since produced while in London offers many insights to his beliefs, which are clearly influenced by his Somali nomadic heritage and his faith.

In 2004, Hadraawi went on a peace march throughout different cities of Somalia ravaged by the civil war, to appeal for peace and to show his solidarity with those suffering. What was one-man’s walk became a march of tens of thousands of Somalis who followed Hadraawi from city to city.

The last two poems that Hadraawi published are, ‘Dhul Gariir’ and ‘Awaal Tiris’. In ‘Dhul Gariir’, he raises awareness about the situation of the Gabooye Somalis, condemning the ill treatment, discrimination and human rights abuses committed against the Gabooye people. The more recent poem, ‘Awaal Tiris’ addresses the hopelessness of Somali men who abuse the use of Qaat and the social implications that comes with that.
Hadraawi now lives in his home town Burao with his wife Hodan and teaches at the University of Burao

We are grateful to our partners and sponsors who made this publication possible such as Prince Claus and Dahabshiil Money Transfer Company.

kayd.org

September 27, 2012

Mass Graves exhumations begin in Somaliland by a Peruvian forensic anthropology team (EPAF)


Mass Graves exhumations begin in Somaliland by a Peruvian forensic anthropology team (EPAF)

A Peruvian forensic anthropology team has started on a project that is expected to reveal details of the widespread atrocities that were committed under the rule of dictator Siyad Barre against the people of Somaliland.

Truth behind enforced disappearances, extrajudicial executions, torture and other human rights violations of Somalilanders is about to be unearthed.

The Peruvian Forensic Anthropology Team – EPAF, has begun exhumations in in the country, as part of a five-year agreement signed with the government thus unearth the truth behind an estimated 60,000 civilian deaths and hundreds of victims of enforced disappearances from 1970 to 1991.

The EPAF team which will also training local forensic personnel and college students of biomedical sciences in order to avail of the country relevant forensic expertise.

The exhumations result from the enforced disappearances, extrajudicial executions, torture and other human rights violations perpetrated during the reign of dictator Siyad Barre whose underlings are credited with the over 60,000 deaths and hundreds of unexplained disappearances

One of the main perpetrators in this case is General Mohamed Ali Samatar, who was Vice President and Defense Minister of the Democratic Republic of Somalia from 1980 to 1986. In January 1987, Samatar took over as Prime Minister of Somalia, until the fall of Barre dictatorship in 1990.

During the cause of its duties, the Jose Pablo’s led EPAF team that also includes a number of international journalists is assisted by Mr. Abdiaziz Mohamed Diriye who was part of the team that brought Gen Ali Samatar to justice in the USA where he was found guilty of committing atrocities against Somalilanders and fine $21 Million.

While informing that most of the mass graves documented has a minimum of 12 corpses the national massacre investigations committee, which is supporting the EPAF, work, gave the following breakdown of mass graves so far identified:-

I. Hargeisa (Maroodi-Jeeh region) – 200 mass graves

II. Berbera (Sahil region) – 12 mass graves

III. Burao (Togdheer region) – 8 mass graves

IV. Sheikh (Sahil region) – 1 mass grave

V. Erigavo (Sanaag region) – 2 mass graves

VI. Arabsiyo (Gabile region) – 1 mass grave

The Peruvian Forensic Anthropology Team (EPAF) is a non-profit organization that promotes the right to truth, justice, and guarantees of non-repetition in cases of forced disappearance and extrajudicial execution. EPAF seeks to contribute to the consolidation of peace and democracy where grave human rights violations have taken place by working alongside the families of the disappeared to find their loved ones, gain access to justice, and improve the conditions affecting their political and economic development.

To achieve these goals, EPAF works in four principal areas: Forensic Investigation, Historical Memory, Forensic Training, and Human Development.

 Peruvian Forensic Anthropology (EPAF): http://epafperu.org/epaf-inicia-exhumaciones-en-somalilandia/

February 23, 2012

London Rally for Somaliland International Recognition outside 10 Downing Street 22nd February 2012

Filed under: NEWS — somaliland247 @ 5:57 pm
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London Rally for Somaliland International Recognition outside 10 Downing Street 22nd February 2012

February 13, 2012

Video:Maxkamadeynta Dhagarqabe Jen. Maxamed Cali Samatar Oo 21ka Bishan Ka Furmaysa Dalka Mareykanka


CJA :The Center For Justice & Accountability Letter on General Ali Samantar case

Dear Friends,

I am writing to share some exciting news. After over seven years of litigation, which has featured two appeals, including one that went all the way to the Supreme Court, and travel to six countries ranging from the U.S. to Djibouti to Somaliland, with stops in Italy, England, and Switzerland – our case against General Mohamed Samantar is finally going to trial.

As you may know, this is the first case to go to trial that will seek to hold any member of the former Siad Barre regime responsible for the countless atrocities that were inflicted on innocent civilians in Somalia in the 1980s. During the 1980s, General Samantar served as the highest ranking military official in the country and held the positions of Defense Minister, First Vice President, and Prime Minister. He was Siad Barre’s right-hand and the commander of the armed forces that unleashed the campaign of terror.
For more on the case, click here.

Along with pro bono co-counsel Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld, we are very honored to represent our four clients who have persevered in their effort to seek justice.

The trial is set to start on February 21. We anticipate that the trial will last approximately two weeks. We would be delighted if you are able to attend some of the proceedings. If not, be sure to follow us on Facebook or Twitter. The trial will take place at  Albert V. Bryan U.S. Courthouse, 401 Courthouse Square, Alexandria, VA. If you have any questions please e-mail mdegaetano@cja.org.

Sincerely,
Pamela Merchant
Executive Director

http://myemail.constantcontact.com/Samantar-Trial-Starts-Feb–21st.html?soid=1101292569561&aid=WBsQE1LdTlM#fblike

Video:Maxkamadeynta Dhagarqabe Jen. Maxamed Cali Samatar Oo 21ka Bishan Ka Furmaysa Dalka Mareykanka

January 8, 2012

VIDEO:Madaxweynaha Somaliland Siilaanyo Oo Qaabilay Orod yahankii Caanka ahaa ee Cabdi Bile Cabdi


VIDEO:Madaxweynaha Somaliland Siilaanyo Oo Qaabilay Orod yahankii Caanka ahaa ee Cabdi Bile Cabdi

November 8, 2011

Ohio judge won’t dismiss Somali torture claim suit


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Ohio judge won’t dismiss Somali torture claim suit


Tuesday, November 08, 2011

A federal judge has refused to dismiss a lawsuit alleging torture claims against a former Somali military colonel who lives in Ohio.

Defendant Abdi Aden Magan (AHB’-dee AH’-den MAH’-gen) argues the lawsuit was filed in the wrong country and too long after when his accuser says the abuse occurred.

Former human rights advocate in Somalia Abukar Hassan Ahmed (ah-BOO’-kar HAHS’-sahn AK’-med) sued Magan in April 2010, alleging the colonel oversaw his detention and torture there in 1988.

U.S. District Court Judge George Smith on Monday ruled Ahmed had standing to sue in the United States and the time limit for filing such a lawsuit hadn’t expired.

The judge relied in part on a motion from the U.S. Department of State saying Magan shouldn’t be allowed to claim immunity from the allegations.

1)Former Chief of Somali NSS faces lawsuit for torture

2)US State Department: former Somali colonel living in US can’t claim immunity in torture suit

3)Somali Torture Claim: Alleged Victim Says He Still Suffers

VIDEO

http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/U/US_SOMALIA_TORTURE_CLAIM?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT

October 6, 2011

ExtendedBITS: Building a bridge between Somaliland and Europe


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ExtendedBITS: Building a bridge between Somaliland and Europe

By Bertil van Vugt 

Every month the VC4Africa team places a new venture in the spotlights. Now we will meet Hasan Giire, one of the founders of ExtendedBITS.

Can you please describe your venture?

ExtendedBITS is an international enterprise with the headquarter in the Netherlands and a software factory in Somaliland. Our business model is providing Dutch and later European companies with (extra) IT-resources. Our office in Somaliland employs young IT-professionals. Those specialists will be working as an extension for their Dutch clients. Our office in the Netherlands serves as the contact point for our clients. All agreement between our company and clients is subject to Dutch laws.

We strongly believe that quality software will drive development. The value of the finished product and the satisfaction of the client are based on the quality insurance throughout the entire project cycle: from requirements to design, from design to development and from development to acceptance of the product. Clear and transparent communication between the parties is therefore imperative. We are providing dedicated professionals for short and long periods of time.”

Can you explain about the current situation in Somaliland?

“Until 1960 Somaliland was a English colony. And when the area became independent from Britain, it was part of Somalia until 1991. After the civil wars in the country, Somaliland decided to be independent from the rest of the country but is not yet a recognized country by the international community. Most people are not aware that Somaliland is a stable country in the region, so they expect risks in investing in our company. We need to tell them about the situation and the fact that there is a local, good functioning government. To give an example, Coca-Cola, the world’s largest soft-drink maker, plans to set-up a bottling plant in the breakaway republic of Somaliland, saying its stability and economic growth provide “conducive” conditions for investment.

There is a free market in Somaliland; utilities like electricity and the telecommunication is in the hand of private companies. In every city, there is more than one company providing those services. Compared to other African countries, Somaliland possesses the best and cheapest rate for telecommunication  (telephone and internet) connection.  Also, the government stimulates business to flourish. The registration of a company can be done within three days. Most of African countries, registration of a company take something like 20 to 40 days.

The people of Somaliland decided to construct their country, set up schools and universities. Every region has one or more universities. Currently more than 2000 students graduate each year from those local universities and high education institutes. Life in there is pleasant if one have work and income. The weather is always good and the people are very friendly.”

Can you tell us about your cooperation with the Eelo University in Borama?

“Intellectuals from the Awdal region set up Eelo University in 2007 and it is specialized in the field of engineering. Our cooperation is the extension of IT-knowledge within the country. First; ExtendedBITS will be the future employer of the graduated students of Eelo University. In the second phase, we will provide extra curriculum activities to the students.”

Who are your clients?

“Our clients are small and medium size IT-companies in the Netherlands that are needing extra resources to implement projects in time. Currently Dutch companies complain about the lack of professional workers in the field of engineering and that is why they outsource the work to Indian or other firms to alleviate this situation. ExtendedBITS is capable to deliver quality, flexibility and cheap hourly rate. Our young professional are eager to establish a decent life in their country and are therefore willing to make the extra miles. The management of the company is from both The Netherlands and Somaliland.  We understand the language and business culture of both countries.”

What are the main questions possible investors have when you talk to them?

“Our strength is that we do not depend on external investments to start our business. At this moment we are about to start with our first assignment and the income of this project will cover our costs. But of course a financial injection will help us to grow more quickly and speed up the international certification process.”

How can members of VC4A contact you?

“Members can contact me via my VC4Africa profile, e-mail: hasan_giire [at] yahoo.com  or  info [at] extendedbits.com and skype: hasan.giire. Also see our website: http://www.extendedbits.com

Source: Venture Capital for Africa:-http://vc4africa.biz/blog/2011/09/23/extendedbits-building-a-bridge-between-somaliland-and-europe/

July 21, 2011

Ex-Somali Prime Minister to be deposed in war crimes suit

Filed under: NEWS — somaliland247 @ 2:59 pm
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Ex-Somali Prime Minister to be deposed in war crimes suit

Ex-Somali Prime Minister Ali Samantar (War Criminal)

ALEXANDRIA, Va. (AP) – Aziz Deria has waited seven years to confront the former Somali leader he blames for the deaths of his father, brother and thousands of his countrymen. He could have his chance this week.

Somalia’s former prime minister Mohamed Ali Samantar is scheduled to begin a deposition Thursday in a federal lawsuit accusing him of war crimes. The northern Virginia resident pulled out of previously planned questioning by citing ill health, but a judge has ordered him to cooperate this time unless extraordinary circumstances arise.

Aziz Deria has waited seven years to confront the former Somali leader he blames for the deaths of his father, brother and thousands of his countrymen. He could have his chance this week. Somalia's former prime minister Mohamed Ali Samantar is scheduled to begin a deposition Thursday, July 21, 2011 in a federal lawsuit accusing him of war crimes.

His accuser is skeptical of his efforts to avoid the deposition.

“This man knows what he has done. He will try to do anything to be away from the court system,” said Deria, a 47-year-old businessman in Bellevue, Wash.

In 2004, a human rights group helped Deria and another man sue Samantar under a U.S. law that allows civil action against foreign officials responsible for torture or wrongful killings. They allege Samantar, a one-time top lieutenant to dictator Siad Barre, commited war crimes against northern Somalia’s Isaaq clan in retribution for what he perceived as efforts to split Somalia in two.

Deria’s father is among those who killed in a crackdown on the clan, the lawsuit alleges. The Barre regime collapsed in 1991, and there hasn’t been a strong national government there since.

Samantar was once one of the most important men in Africa, a power broker who used Somalia’s strategic position on the Horn of Africa to gain alternating favor from the United States and the Soviet Union. He served from 1980 to 1986 as defense minister, building one of most formidable armies in sub-Saharan Africa. He served as prime minister from 1986 to 1990.

He now lives in a split-level in the Washington suburb of Fairfax, surrounded not by presidents and potentates but by large extended family. He is still well-known among Somali diaspora.

His illnesses aren’t contrived, says his lawyer Joseph Peter Drennan, explaining that Samantar is on dialysis and has become weaker in recent weeks. He has filed emergency motions with an appeals court seeking to halt the lawsuit. But a judge has ordered that Samantar submit to three days of depositions this month.

For Deria, who is represented by the San Francisco-based Center for Justice and Accountability, the opportunity to question Samantar is the primary reason he has pursued a lawsuit for so many years. The lawsuit was once tossed out by a federal judge who said Samantar had diplomatic immunity, but the U.S. Supreme Court disagreed and reinstated it.

Samantar isn’t wealthy, so Deria does not expect to profit financially. Holding him accountable is the real goal.

Yet many Somalis, even those victimized by the Barre regime, don’t understand why Deria is pursuing Samantar through the U.S. court system.

“They don’t know how to hold people accountable,” Deria said, referring to Somalis and others throughout the developing world, where political leaders are typically above the law. “I want my people to learn about accountability.”

“For him to pretend he is innocent, and that nobody can touch him, it is insulting to our intelligence,” Deria said.

The Somali diaspora has mixed feelings about Samantar and others from the Barre regime, said Ahmed Elmi, chairman of the Somali American Community Association in Silver Spring, Md. Many don’t understand the need to dredge up the past when bad conditions in Somalia still need attention, he said. And while most recognize that atrocities occurred under Barre, others also remember years when schools were built and the country flourished.

Elmi said Somali immigrants generally respect surviving elders from the Barre regime.

For his part, Elmi understands and supports victims’ desire for justice.

“That’s why we have a court,” Elmi said. “If he did these things to my family, I would do the same.”

The lawsuit is deeply personal to Samantar. In 1988, he was a college student in California when Somalia began to deteriorate. His father, Mohamed Deria Ali, operated a large import-export business and planned to move the family from Hargeisa to the capital of Mogadishu. Before he could, though, the military attacked the town the town where many Issaq clan members lived.

Back in the U.S., Aziz Deria lost contact with his family. He eventually learned that his father and younger brother, Mustafa Deria, were taken from the family home and never seen again.

Still, Deria gives Samantar credit for his role in Somalia’s wars against Ethiopia early in his career. He feels sorry for Samantar in some ways and doesn’t consider him evil.

“He became ruthless to survive,” Deria said. “I don’t think he’s a bad person at all. It’s just the nature of dictators.”

Samantar has refused multiple interview requests, but his lawyer said he didn’t persecute the Isaaq clan while in power.

“Samantar, above all, is a fervent nationalist who believes all Somalis should live under one flag,” Drennan said. “He is proud of his service to his country.”

Drennan said the lawsuit is about clan grievances among the Isaaq, many of whom have pursued establishment of an independent state in northern Somalia.

“Certainly, there were human rights abuses under the Barre regime. It was not a democratic regime. But is it worse than al-Shabab?” he asked, referring to the radical Islamic militia that now controls large swaths of the country and is aligned with al-Qaida.

Deria knows that the lawsuit alone won’t provide closure. He’s also been traveling back to the region surrounding his home city to help provide proper burials for remains from hundreds of mass graves dug during the Barre regime. In the rainy seasons, bones sometimes wash up from the river beds.

“It is so disgusting to see the skeletons come out. Those skeletons could be my father, my brother, my cousins” Deria said. “For me to have any closure, those people need to have a proper burial. … It bothers me whenever it rains. It really makes my heart sink.”

July 11, 2011

Somaliland Youth Alliance Of North America Meets with Canadian MPP David Caplan


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Somaliland Youth Alliance Of North America Meets with Canadian MPP David Caplan

 

It is part of SYANA’s aim to actively promote its goals and create working relationships with the other organizations and elected representatives in the US and Canada. As part of that goal, Robleh Mohamud Aidid (Lafcanbe) of SYANA met with MPP of Don Valley East, David Caplan.

In his Thursday’s meeting, Mr. Aidid explained the vision and goals for SYANA as well as seeing what the local government can do to help the organization. They discussed the aims and goals of the organization and how the representatives assist SYANA to achieve its objectives and help it make a difference in Somaliland Youth. Mr.Caplan was very interested in the organization’s goals and pledged to give guidance, advice and any support SYANA needs. Not only did this meeting benefit the organization with his support, but Mr.Caplan was briefed about the prositive progress Somaliland made.

Mr.Caplan encouraged Mr. Aidid to continue to educating people about Somaliland and spread awareness. SYANA will continue to keep in contact with Mr.Caplan and will with periodical meetings similar to this one. Mr. Aidid and fellow members of SYANA intend to meet with more local politicians and community leaders and organizations in the coming months.

David Caplan was first elected to the provincial legislature in a September 1997 by-election and was re-elected in 1999, 2003 and 2007 to serve the residents of Don-Valley East.

Caplan previously served as Minister of Health and Long-Term Care in June, 2008.

Under his leadership as Minister of Infrastructure Renewal (since 2003), the Government of Ontario won three prestigious urban planning awards recognizing the visionary Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe. Caplan led the introduction of Ontario’s first long-term infrastructure investment plan, ReNew Ontario. In 2005, Caplan assumed oversight of key major public assets, including the Ontario Realty Corporation, the Liquor Control Board of Ontario and the Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corporation, as well as responsibility for Waterfront Toronto. He also served as Deputy Government House Leader.

You can read more information about SYANA by visiting:

www.somalilandyouth.com

www.facebook.com/somalilandyouth

www.twitter.com/somalilandyouth

July 10, 2011

Video: Somaliland President Ahmed Silanyo Speech inside the Plane on his way to South Sudan


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Video: Somaliland President Ahmed Silanyo Speech inside the Plane on his way to South Sudan

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